Schwarzenegger/Brown Policies KILLS Cops

If you create a policy that kills police, are you as responsible as the person that pulled the trigger?  If you knew that the policy would cause more crime, including murder and rape, and thought the trade off was to power prison populations vs. more crime was acceptable, why aren’t you indictable for being a co-conspirator—someone that knew their actions would create harm?

Thomas Daniel Littlecloud, the deceased suspect in the murder of Deputy French was also accused of attempting to murder two CHP officers. Despite having a violent past, Littlecloud was free from custody because of AB 109 parole changes. He had served three prior state prison sentences: a one-year term for grand theft; a 16-month term for vehicle theft; and then a six-year prison term for assault with a semi-automatic weapon. In all cases, he was placed on state parole, with supervision by state parole agents, upon release from prison.

However, following a three-year 2013 prison term for evading a police officer and possession of a gun, the suspect was placed on PRCS in Alameda County, where he promptly violated the conditions of release.”

Why aren’t we holding the politicians accountable for these murders?  AB 109, the bill that threw 50,000 criminals out of prison and kept tens of thousands more from going to prison,  is a killer—as much as those committing a crime.

SAN DIEGO, CA - JULY 18: Arnold Schwarzenegger arrives for the "Escape Plan" Premiere - Comic-Con International 2013 at Reading Cinemas Gaslamp on July 18, 2013 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic)

On August 30, 2017, Sacramento County Sheriff’s Deputy Robert French was killed by a felon; on February 20, 2017, Whittier Officer Keith Boyer was killed by a felon. In both cases, their killers were free to roam the streets thanks to AB 109.

Our condolences go out to the family and friends of Deputy French, and we are praying for the two wounded CHP officers. While Deputy French’s family and colleagues prepare for his services and honor him for his sacrifice to the community, it is natural to look for answers and ask could this tragedy have been avoided? Did the justice system fail Officer Boyer and Deputy French?

One of the central features of AB 109 was the attempt to eliminate the recidivism rate for state parolees – by essentially eliminating parole. State parole agent positions were eliminated, and instead, supervision of newly released prison inmates was given to already overburdened county probation officers in a program known as Post Release Community Supervision (PRCS). Violations of parole were to be handled not by a return to state prison for up to one year following a Parole Board hearing. Instead, impositions of 10-day “flash incarcerations” were invented, and if a revocation of PRCS was sought, it required a hearing before a local judge with a custody sentence limited to six months in county jail.

Thomas Daniel Littlecloud, the deceased suspect in the murder of Deputy French was also accused of attempting to murder two CHP officers. Despite having a violent past, Littlecloud was free from custody because of AB 109 parole changes. He had served three prior state prison sentences: a one-year term for grand theft; a 16-month term for vehicle theft; and then a six-year prison term for assault with a semi-automatic weapon. In all cases, he was placed on state parole, with supervision by state parole agents, upon release from prison.

However, following a three-year 2013 prison term for evading a police officer and possession of a gun, the suspect was placed on PRCS in Alameda County, where he promptly violated the conditions of release. A bench warrant from Alameda County was out for his arrest on December 15, 2016, when he led police officers in Sonoma County on a foot chase after they discovered the warrant. After being apprehended, a loaded handgun was found in his jacket, as well as a knife he admitted to officers he had planned to use to attack a police K-9. The car he fled from contained a loaded handgun, meth, heroin, prescription pills, fraudulent ids and fraudulent bank cards.

That arrest apparently led to a federal indictment in June 2016, as well as charges in Sonoma County. However, he was released from custody on bail from the federal case in August 2016 and never showed up to court for arraignment in Sonoma County.

Prior to AB 109, a no bail warrant for a violation of parole would have been issued for Littlecloud and served upon him following his December 2016 arrest. He would have remained in custody while awaiting both resolution of his new criminal cases and a parole revocation hearing that, based on his continued criminality, would have resulted in a one-year return to state prison. Most importantly, he would not have been on the streets in August, 2017 and able to murder Deputy French.

The attempt by the state legislature to game recidivism statistics doesn’t change the reality of parolee behavior and law violations after release from prison. For example, the Los Angeles County Probation Department’s “Most Wanted” list  is filled with dangerous felons the department pointedly notes they were assigned to supervise because of AB 109 and have failed to report after release from prison.

As we prepare to lay Deputy French to rest, it is time to come together as a state and admit that there is a major problem with the current system. AB 109 is a bad experiment with public safety in California and has already cost the lives of two law enforcement officers this year.

The Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs (ALADS) is the collective bargaining agent representing more than 7,900 deputy sheriffs and district attorney investigators working in Los Angeles County.

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