Monterey Herald Editorial: Republicans No Longer Relevant in California

Why is the Republican Party in California no longer relevant?  Let me count the ways

  1. While claiming to be the Party of limited government and lower taxes, it was a Republican State Senator, Anthony Cannella, that gave Guv Brown and the Democrats the needed vote to create a $52 billion slush fund in the name of road repair—maybe 50% of that money will go to roads—and even that will be eaten by by payoffs to unions.
  2. Since 2012 the GOP has lost a net of 306,000 registered voters and the California Republican Party ENDED it registration program and has spent zero dollars in four years.
  3. At it recent convention there were eleven officers up for election, and except for a last minute JOKE nomination for one position, all eleven had NO opposition—why be responsible for an organization that in the past four years gave almost NO interviews to the media on public policy. What does the GOP stand for?  Silence

“The upshot is that legislation increasingly favors the public employee unions who give heavily to Democratic candidates, and to left-of-center initiatives that would not play well in the Rust Belt or the southern United States, but are unquestioned in California.

The lack of debate on many issues, however, is not healthy. One-party rule historically has led to overreach and even corruption among elected officials, who have no need to moderate positions to appeal to centrist or conservative voters.

It has come to this: Trump has only sounded what for now seems like the death knell for a once-relevant and viable opposition party.”

At least Trump stand for something.  Now the GOP is yelling about the passage of SB-1, the slush fund.  Yet, not one has mentioned it would not have passed with GOP support.  Honesty helps.  Hard work helps.  The Republicans of California need to oppose the racism and violence on campus—for the safety of the students.  We need to push for lower taxes—and say something about those that oppose it.  Believe in the Second Amendment?  A Republican Assemblyman has an anti-Second Amendment bill—AB 1525.  Why is the GOP irrelevant?  Look at the record.

Photo courtesy of DonkeyHotey, flickr

Editorial, April 4, 2017: Republicans no longer relevant in California

Monterey Herald Editorial, 04/03/17,

The demise of the Republican party in the state has been advancing for years, but has now become an accepted fact. While this has also been the relativley recent rule in Monterey County, the GOP continued to have an influence in state legislation and politics until the end of the governorship of Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2010.

But no more.

The recent report on voter registration in the state showed that Republicans hitting the truly endangered list with just under 26 percent of 19.4 million potential voters.

The party had a nearly 35 percent share in 2000.

Democrats now have nearly 45 percent of potential voters, though the party actually lost about a half point since 2000. The biggest increase came from potential voters who declined to state a party preference — 24.5 percent, up from 14.4 percent in 2000.

This trend would amaze Californians from a generation ago, since Republicans once dominated the political landscape in California. The only two presidents coming from the state — Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan — were both Republicans. But no Republican has won the state’s presidential votes since George H.W. Bush in 1988. Except for Schwarzenegger, no Republican has held statewide office this century, and the former governor was something of an outlier as a politician because of his celebrity.

Some of the move away from the party can be associated with the deeply unpopular presidency of Donald J. Trump, who lost the state to Hillary Clinton by more than 4.2 million votes, receiving only 31.5 percent of the vote.

And this antipathy to all things Trump undoubtedly means Republicans will do miserably in the 2018 midterm elections as well. Democrats already have a supermajority in the state Legislature — meaning they can approve tax increases and regulations to their hearts’ content without needing any GOP votes. And some prognosticators say Republicans will fall even further back in the next election.

So what happened?

The party’s decline is often traced back to Republican Gov. Pete Wilson’s support for Proposition 187, the 1994 ballot measure that cut public benefits to undocumented immigrants. The measure so antagonized the state’s growing Latino voting population and other immigrant communities that they began voting as a bloc for Democrats.

Another trend was the virtual end of the aerospace industry in the Los Angeles area in the 1990s, which resulted in an out migration of defense industry workers, many of whom voted for Republican candidates, from the state’s biggest population center, and an inflow of immigrant workers, who mostly voted Democratic.

The rise of the tech industry in the 1990s, which continues today, also gave Democrats a boost, as skilled workers from other countries have mostly voted Democratic.

And while Republicans are still somewhat viable in the state’s rural and agricultural areas, the population-rich coastal areas are solidly blue.

The upshot is that legislation increasingly favors the public employee unions who give heavily to Democratic candidates, and to left-of-center initiatives that would not play well in the Rust Belt or the southern United States, but are unquestioned in California.

The lack of debate on many issues, however, is not healthy. One-party rule historically has led to overreach and even corruption among elected officials, who have no need to moderate positions to appeal to centrist or conservative voters.

It has come to this: Trump has only sounded what for now seems like the death knell for a once-relevant and viable opposition party.

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